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In This Issue of the Sierra Club Insider:
Smart Energy Summer: Top 10 Summer Energy Tips
Global Warming Goes to the Supreme Court
Act Now: Help Defend the Arctic Refuge
A Blue-Haired Green Superhero
BlogWatch: Another Chance to See
State Take the Lead on Mercury & Global Warming
EXPLORE: Blue and Green Ohio
ENJOY: Three Green Films Too Hot to Miss This Summer
PROTECT: July 11 is World Population Day
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Sierra Club Insider June 27, 2006
Smart Energy Summer: Top 10 Summer Energy Tips
Smart Energy     SummerSummer is here and everything's looking up: temperatures, fuel prices, and electrical bills are all climbing. What can you do about it?

Check out the Sierra Club's Smart Energy Summer. Each week we'll feature an energy issue and give you information and advice to help you get through the summer without having a meltdown.

This week, our focus is on Efficiency and Conservation. To get started, read our Top 10 Summer Energy Tips.

Then, test your Energy IQ with our Efficiency and Conservation Quiz.

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Compass


Global Warming Goes to the Supreme Court
Global Warming Goes to the Supreme Court Last week, the Supreme Court announced that it would consider a case that will decide whether the Clean Air Act requires the Bush administration to regulate carbon dioxide and the other heat-trapping gases that cause global warming.

After the Environmental Protection Agency announced its refusal to regulate global warming emissions in 2003, a coalition of states, cities, and environmental groups including the Sierra Club, filed the lawsuit. Last summer, a split decision in a lower court set up the appeal that brought this case to the Supreme Court. Ultimately, the Supreme Court will decide whether or not the EPA is required under the Clean Air Act to regulate the pollutants that cause global warming.

While the Supreme Court is considering whether EPA should regulate global warming emissions, members of Congress are introducing legislation that would actually reduce global warming emissions to a safe level. Urge your member of Congress to cosponsor the "Safe Climate Act" which was recently introduced by Rep. Waxman (D-CA).


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Sewage 101


Act Now: Help Defend the Arctic Refuge
Help Defend the Arctic RefugeThe House of Representatives just passed a bill to allow drilling in the Arctic Refuge. Even twenty years down the road, when this oil would be at or near peak production, gas prices would only be affected by about a penny per gallon...and the pristine Arctic Refuge and the wildlife that depend on it for their survival would have been sacrificed for virtually nothing!

We need your immediate support to keep drilling out of the Arctic and preserve our last protected wild areas.

Some places are so precious they should be off-limits to oil drilling and industrial development, and the Arctic Refuge is one of them.

Donate Now


A Blue-Haired Green Superhero
Blue-Haired Green SuperheroShe wears a hot-blue biking miniskirt with a sparkly rainbow cape and rainbow leg warmers, and she calls herself Rabbi Yikes. A comic book superhero? Nope, she's the real thing. She and her caped cohorts may not be able fly faster than a speeding bullet, but they can and do bicycle from town to town. When they arrive, they fan out to the Chamber of Commerce and City Hall in their costumes and ask what needs to be done before springing into action. In Asheville, North Carolina, they cleaned up a riverfront and turned it into bike lanes. In New Orleans, they helped with demolition and cleanup projects. Best of all, their tribe is increasing: When they took their first trip six years ago, there were fifteen of them; now there are more than 250.

Find out more in Sierra magazine’s "One Small Step: Who Is That Caped Woman?"


BlogWatch: Another Chance to See
Another Chance to See In the late 1980s, author Douglas Adams (Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy) and zoologist Mark Cawardine traveled the world for a BBC radio series in which they sought out some of the world’s most endangered species. The radio series was eventually turned into a book called Last Chance to See -- a wise and funny look at the saddest topic imaginable: Extinction.

Which brings us to the blog, Another Chance to See, which is the brainchild of a man named Gareth Suddes. As Suddes wrote in his introductory post in July 2004: “So many of the fascinating creatures they had described were teetering on the very brink of extinction back in the late 1980s, one had to wonder how they were doing now, some 15 years later. I thought a blog might be a good way to bring the stories up-to-date.” Sadly, the updates are not always encouraging. A recent survey of northern white rhinos, for instance, found only four.

States Take the Lead
With the federal government dragging its feet, states like Minnesota and Pennsylvania are taking the lead in reducing mercury and global warming emissions.

Read about it in the July/August edition of The Planet.


Not a Club Member? Join Now and Help Protect Endangered     and Threatened Wildlife and Preserve the Places You Love

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      EXPLORE
Blue and Green Ohio

Former Sierra Club President Larry Fahn and David Foster of the United Steelworkers did a barnstorming tour of Ohio recently to tout good jobs and clean energy. Not only did they show up in every decent-sized city from Cincinnati to Cleveland but they also appeared in the newspaper business pages almost everywhere they went. They even went on conservative talk radio and were surprisingly well received. View a slide show from the tour and check out Fahn’s chronicle of the week-long Ohio tour.

Blue Green Alliance
ENJOY
Three Green Films Too Hot to Miss This Summer

1. Who Killed the Electric Car? In his hilarious new documentary (in theatres now), writer/director Chris Paine answers the title question and makes a compelling case for the continued viability of the elusive electric car.

2. An Inconvenient Truth Al Gore's stunning multimedia presentation has one agenda: to raise awareness and understanding of the onset of global warming. Davis Guggenheim's documentary shows a warm, engaging Gore delivering his fascinating slide show on global warming around the world.

3. Global Warming: What You Need to Know This Discovery Channel special, hosted by Tom Brokaw, considers the specter of global warming tipping points and examines the latest evidence on the subject. It also discusses solutions and what the average American family can do. Premieres on Sunday, July 16, at 9 p.m.

Three Movies to See

PROTECT

July 11 is World Population Day

Half of the world's population is under 25. That’s why the focus of this year’s World Population Day is on young people, who are better able to make responsible choices when they have access to information about their health. And that’s why the Sierra Club supports comprehensive sex education programs.

Unfortunately, the Bush administration and the U.S. Congress continue to support funding for abstinence-only programs that leave young people uninformed and in the dark. Perhaps that helps explain why the United States has the highest teenage pregnancy rate of any developed nation in the world.

Please join the Club's Global Population and Environment Program and its coalition partners is saying NO to more money for abstinence-only programs.

World     Population Day
Photos: Melanie Grubman (Chris Sommers)