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The Planet
Natural Resources

Editor's Note:

This Q & A feature of The Planet is a combination of how-to tips and activist experiences. Sometimes we'll consult an expert in the field; other times we'll solicit expert advice from our readers.

What's your favorite green gift to give?

"I like to give camping equipment, particularly a nice insulated cup or a backcountry French press. I know people who like to go backpacking but miss having the comforts of home, like a good cup of coffee in the morning. Also, making wilderness feel comfortable can help instill a conservation ethic - people want to protect their home.

- David Westman, public lands conservation organizer Sierra Student Coalition

"For a green gift package, I'd include a donation made in the person's name to a charitable organization (animal shelters are my personal favorite), a neat item from a thrift store or yard sale (to emphasize reusing), a handful of my favorite vegetarian recipes and a tube of Tom's of Maine toothpaste, all packaged in a reusable mesh or canvas grocery bag."

- Abby Harper, newsletter editor Virginia Chapter

"I relish local food - is there anything better than maple syrup or smoked salmon?"

- Anne Fuller, member Juneau, Alaska

"My favorite green gift is a copy of William Irwin Thompson's 'The American Replacement of Nature.' It's a wonderful romp into the core of our culture and reveals so well the American anti-nature psyche. Thompson writes that in American society, 'history is replaced by movies, education is replaced with entertainment, and nature is replaced with technology.' It is a must-read for anyone seeking to make a difference."

- Clark A. Buchner, chair Tennessee Chapter

Want to contribute?

Send us your answers to the following questions for upcoming issues: What was your first action as an activist? What's your best tip for "living lightly" on the planet? Send them to "Natural Resources," The Planet, Sierra Club, 85 Second St., Second Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94105 or planet@sierraclub.org.

Deadline: January 1


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