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The Planet
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Warning: Norton Ahead

Gale Norton has disrupted the Department of Interior so drastically that some of her own employees are calling for her to resign. That's according to a report by the Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility that says Norton is "wreaking havoc" by shutting down e-mail and agency Internet sites for months, misrepresenting agency science on the effects of oil drilling in caribou calving grounds and announcing that agency jobs will soon be farmed out to private companies - 5 percent in a year and up to half in five years. Find out more.

157 Down, One to Go

As a coda to its successful effort to shut down the incinerator at Detroit's Henry Ford Hospital (October 2001 Planet), the Club's Mackinac Chapter gave its annual "White Pine Award" for 2001 to hospital Chief Operating Officer Nancy Schlichting, at right, for "her leadership in...managing the hospital's medical and solid waste." Next up for the chapter's Southeast Michigan Group, says Conservation Co-Chair Anna Holden, at left, is shutting down the only medical waste incinerator left in the state, in Hamtramck; 157 Michigan hospitals have closed incinerators since 1995.

Klamath Basin Calamities

Threatened fish -- the shortnose sucker, Lost River sucker and coho salmon -- in the Upper Klamath Lake and the Klamath River were dealt a blow in February. An interim report by the National Academy of Sciences suggested that, in the face of regional drought, the Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service had "no substantial scientific foundation" to withhold water from farmers in order to provide the fish more water. A full report is due in 18 months.


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