Sierra Club Home Page   Environmental Update  
chapter button
Explore, enjoy and protect the planet
Click here to visit the Member Center.         
Search
Take Action
Get Outdoors
Join or Give
Inside Sierra Club
Press Room
Politics & Issues
Sierra Magazine
Sierra Club Books
Apparel and Other Merchandise
Contact Us

Join the Sierra ClubWhy become a member?

Backtrack
Planet Main
In This Section
  Features
Lands Worth Fighting For: Steens Mountain
Lands Worth Fighting For: Owyhee Canyonlands
Building Environmental Community
A Ten Megawatt Idea:
New Jobs and Energy Independence
Roadless Rule Reversed
State Field Report
From Conflict to Cooperation
   
  Alerts
Rocky Mountain Front
Factory Farm Polluters
   
  Departments
From the Editor
Insider
Clubbeat
Who We Are
   
PDF version of the planet
Search for an Article
Free Subscription
Back Issues

The Planet
Roadless Rule Reversed

By Tom Valtin

It's almost as if there'd been a sign saying "no roadbuilding or logging" and the Bush administration crossed out the word "no."

The Roadless Area Conservation Rule--signed by President Clinton after receiving more than 2 million public comments, 95 percent of which favored the strongest protections--would have protected 58 million acres of roadless wild forests from roadbuilding and logging. But the Bush administration has stood the rule on its head with a convoluted process that requires governors to petition the Forest Service not to build roads or log these roadless wild forests in their states. And even after preparing and submitting a petition, the Forests Service can reject the request out-of-hand. The administration has already said the national forests in Alaska will not be protected by the rule.

Take action: The Sierra Club and its coalition partner have set an ambitious goal of generating 1 million comments to the Forest Service by the end of the public comment period on September 14. Tell Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth you support protecting all national forest roadless areas from logging, road construction, and other damaging activities. These wild forests provide clean water, fish and wildlife habitat, and backcountry recreation.

For more information, and to send a message to the Forest Service, go to the Sierra Club's Take Action site.

 


Up to Top