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Sierra Magazine
Lay of the Land

Russia's Green Menace | For the Record | Wilderness blackmail | Naming Clearcutters | Crashing WTO's party | Roads to Nowhere | Bold Strokes | UPDATES

For the Record

Thorofare Ranger Station, in the southeast corner of Yellowstone National Park, has been declared the most remote spot in the Lower 48. The outpost is 32 trail miles and 20 air miles from the nearest publicly maintained road. Remote runners-up are a site in the Bob Marshall Wilderness in Montana (18 air miles from a road) and a spot in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness in Idaho (16 miles).
Source: Cartographic Technologies, Brattleboro, Vermont

"We may carry our teeth in a can, put braces on our legs before we start out, bury three extra baggies of hormones and Advils in our packs, and a few extra batteries for our hearing aids, but we have no trouble getting into the wilderness on our own two feet. This idea that you need a machine to get somewhere is just a bunch of macho bunk."
Susan Tixier, executive director of Great Old Broads for Wilderness, one of several environmental groups that have sued the Bureau of Land Management for failing to protect Utah's public lands from off-road vehicles.

Organic farms produce fine habitat as well as good food: They can support 57 percent more wild plant species, three times more non-pest butterflies, and as many as 44 percent more birds in cropped areas than conventional farms.
Source: Soil Association, Bristol, United Kingdom


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