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  Sierra Magazine
  September/October 2008
Table of Contents
 
  COOL SCHOOLS:
Cool Crowd
Ten That Get It
Five That Fail
Hot Jobs to Chill the Planet
Talk of the Quad
Eco-Dorms
Good Green Reads
 
  MORE FEATURES:
Staring Down Doomsday
Profiles in Courage
Carbon Confessional
Vertigo
 
  DEPARTMENTS:
Spout
Create
Enjoy
Hey Mr. Green
Smile
Ponder
Explore
Act
Grapple
Mixed Media
Comfort Zone
Bulletin
 
  MORE:
Sierra Archives
Corrections
About Sierra
Internships at Sierra
Advertising Information
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Sierra Magazine
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Hot Jobs to Chill the Planet
By Lea Hartog and Michael Fox
September/October 2008

Inside-track green job advice from your peers.

CAMPUS COLLABORATOR: Praween Dayananda, 25

THE JOB: As the campus field coordinator at the National Wildlife Federation's Austin, Texas, offices, Dayananda helps universities audit their greenhouse-gas emissions and launch behavior-changing campaigns.

WHY HE DOES IT: "Our planet that has miraculously sustained life so far is changing because of our actions. We still have many ways to improve the situation."

ADVICE: "Don't limit yourself to working for a typical green group. Any work is fine as long as it is done with a sense of compassion and concern for humanity and our planet.


WEED WARRIOR: Serena Dennis, 24

THE JOB: A river ranger at Dinosaur National Monument in Colorado and Utah, Dennis rafts the Green and Yampa Rivers to remove invasive plants and teach environmental stewardship.

WHY SHE DOES IT: "I never thought I'd find a job that combined restoration with whitewater rafting. I love working with volunteers and knowing I made a difference."

ADVICE: "Internships! They are a great way to find out what you are interested in, make connections, meet people, and gain valuable work experience."


GREEN BUSINESS WHIZ: John Dowker, 25

THE JOB: As an associate at Seattle-based Cascadia Capital, Dowker helps renewable energy entrepreneurs refine their business plans and raise money.

WHY HE DOES IT: "Clean tech is really taking off, and helping grow the clean economy is pretty cool."

ADVICE: "Lots of clean-tech start-ups are looking for people who can fill multiple roles. This lets you learn about different areas of the business and helps you figure out where you want to focus your career."


RUST BELT ORGANIZER: Kim Teplitzky, 23

THE JOB: After working with the Sierra Student Coalition during her senior year of college, Teplitzky stuck with the group and became a regional organizer. She helps college and high school students launch Campus Climate Challenge campaigns.

WHY SHE DOES IT: "When I graduated, it was a perfect fit to jump into organizing with the SSC on the Climate Challenge and help students run similar campaigns."

ADVICE: "Get trained! Most groups are looking to hire young people who already have some experience."


MASTER MAPPER: Aaron Johnson, 25

THE JOB: As a biological science technician with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Johnson studies the life cycles of invasive plants to find ways to control them. He also uses remote-sensing data to create maps of weed-distribution patterns.

WHY HE DOES IT: "I get to work outside and satisfy my desire for hands-on work with plants, while I also get to be at the high-tech frontier of weed management."

ADVICE: "Do as many projects with professors as you can--and summer internships in a wide array of fields."


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