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REPURPOSE | Trash into Treasures

KEY RACK FROM OLD KEYS
Turn your mystery keys into hooks for the ones you still use

By Wendy Becktold


Lori Eanes

Lose any metal objects lately? Put in a request at lostmystuff.net and someone with a metal detector just might show up to try to find it free of charge. These volunteers are kind of like superheroes with headphones. One of them even located a college ring that had been lost since 1977. I wish one would follow me around my house, because I constantly misplace my keys.

Here's the strange thing: While the keys I use daily often go missing, I have a growing pile of mystery keys in a tin on my dresser. I'm sure they were important once, and I probably tried hard not to lose them. But now I have no idea what they're meant to unlock, and for some reason I can't imagine throwing them out.

This project, then, is a twofer. With a piece of wood, screws, and some pliers, I transformed the castoffs into a rack to hold and organize my current stash. It was quick and easy, and I had all the materials on hand. Now I just have to remember to hang my keys there.

DIFFICULTY LEVEL: 1 | CONSTRUCTION TIME: 1 hour
An electric drill comes in handy, but nails and a hammer work just as well.


Wendy Becktold
WHAT YOU'LL NEED:

  • 3 to 5 keys, one for each hook (plus extras in case a few break)
  • Pliers
  • Vise (optional)
  • Piece of wood (9.5 inches wide by 3 inches high is a good size for 4 keys)
  • Ruler or measuring tape
  • Nails or wood screws (one for each key)
  • Hammer for nails or electric drill for wood screws


Based on a project by Nicholas Torretta at viraroque.blogspot.com.


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