Shark Attack

"Hitting the shark was the right thing to do."

It was a perfect fall morning just before Halloween on the peninsula shielding Northern California's Humboldt Bay. High-tide peaks were breaking up and down the beach, and the water was clean and clear. I caught four waves in quick succession, laughing at my good luck. Then it changed.

  • Survive: Shark Attack

    From behind me, something dark broke the surface. Luckily for me, the board took the brunt of the force.

    Koren Shadmi

  • Survive: Shark Attack

    The shark dragged me under and shook me once. I hit it behind the eye, which felt like punching a bag of concrete, but it let me go.

    Koren Shadmi

  • Survive: Shark Attack

    I paddled to shore, creating a crimson pool around me. I wondered how much blood I had left to lose.

    Koren Shadmi

  • Survive: Shark Attack

    A surfer who was an off-duty paramedic lay on my wound to stop the bleeding, while another guy drove me to the hospital.

    Koren Shadmi

  • Survive: Shark Attack

    Modern medicine saved my life. Four weeks to the day of the accident, I was back in the water surfing.

    Koren Shadmi

ASK THE EXPERT
Salvador Jorgensen is a research scientist and white shark expert at California's& Monterey Bay Aquarium.

"When you enter the ocean in California, you are entering a wilderness where you could be mistaken for a seal by a white shark. Hitting the shark was the right thing to do. During our research trips, when white sharks get too frisky near the boat, a tap on the nose with a pole is enough to make them turn and back off."

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