Sierra Club Home Page   Environmental Update  
chapter button
Explore, enjoy and protect the planet
Click here to visit the Member Center.         
Search
Take Action
Get Outdoors
Join or Give
Inside Sierra Club
Press Room
Politics & Issues
Sierra Magazine
Sierra Club Books
Apparel and Other Merchandise
Contact Us

Join the Sierra ClubWhy become a member?

Stopping Sprawl campaign home page - click here.
Get an overview. Sign up for an e-newsletter. Find out what you can do to help.
Backtrack
Environmental Update Main
Sprawl Main
In This Section
Sprawl Overview
Reports & Factsheets
Activist Resources
Get Involved!
Communities
Transportation
Articles & Research
Population and Sprawl

Get The Sierra Club Insider
Environmental news, green living tips, and ways to take action: Subscribe to the Sierra Club Insider!

Subscribe!

Stop Sprawl
1998 Sierra Club Sprawl Report: 30 Most Sprawl-Threatened Cities

Ten Most Sprawl-Threatened Large Cities
No. 11 - 20

11. Detroit
In 1994, Detroit drivers wasted 57 hours per person in traffic, the seventh highest figure in the country. This was a 30 percent jump from 1990, the sixth highest increase in the country over that period.

12. Baltimore
From 1970 to 1980, Baltimore's population density dropped more than 34 percent, the highest figure in the country.  In 1994, Baltimore drivers spent 138 percent more time in traffic than in 1982.

13. Cleveland
Cleveland's population density dropped 24 percent from 1990 to 1996, the sixth highest figure in the country. From 1982 to 1994, time wasted in traffic increased 260 percent, by far the highest increase in the country.

14. Tampa
From 1982 to 1992, the amount of developed land increased 32 percent, the tenth highest jump in the country. From 1990 to 1996, Tampa's population density dropped 19 percent, the eighth highest drop in the country.

15. Dallas
In 1996, residents of the Dallas metropolitan area traveled 29.8 miles per day per person, a figure second only to Atlanta. In 1994, Dallas drivers wasted 55 hours per person caught in traffic.

16. Hampton Roads
From 1990 to 1996, the ratio of the Hampton Roads, Va. urban population to its suburban population plummeted 54.6 percent, the third highest drop in the country. This followed a 74.1 percent drop from 1980 to 1990, the second highest drop in the country over that time.

17. Pittsburgh
From 1980 to 1990, the population density of the Pittsburgh metropolitan area dropped 15 percent, the third highest drop in the country.

18. Miami

From 1982 to 1992, the amount of developed land in the Miami metropolitan area increased 35.8 percent, the sixth highest increase in the country.

19. San Antonio
In 1994, San Antonio drivers wasted 32 percent more time in traffic than they did in 1990, the fifth highest increase in the country.

20. Riverside/San Bernardino
From 1980 to 1990, the ratio of Riverside/San Bernardino's city population to its suburban population plunged 87.1 percent, the highest drop in the country. In 1994, drivers here wasted 75 hours caught in traffic, also the highest figure in the country.

Another Hot Spot for Sprawl: Salt Lake City, UT
In response to studies projecting continued population growth and its consequences for the traffic in the area, Gov. Mike Leavitt has proposed building an entire new freeway system, called the Legacy Highway. Most of the 120-mile route would
run through remote areas without any urbanized centers. The Legacy Highway is designed to create sprawl by facilitating new, low-density housing subdivisions.

A broad coalition of groups is uniting to defeat the Legacy Highway. This coalition consists of farmers, cattle ranchers, duck hunters, bird and wildlife advocacy groups, taxpayer watchdog groups, transportation planners, air quality groups and grassroots environmentalists. The battle over the Legacy Highway promises to determine the rate and quality of future growth in Salt Lake City.

Read the Report | Clickable Sprawl Map | Sprawl-Threatened Cities


Up to Top | Printer-friendly version of this page