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Sierra Magazine: Explore, enjoy and protect the planet.
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Eat Your Bugs!

There are many environmental reasons to eat insects. But first you have to get past the ick factor.

By Peter Frick-Wright


Photo illustration by Aaron Goodman

You have to be careful not to overcook scorpions. The exoskeleton traps steam, and they're messy when they pop.

"But get it right," said "Bug Chef" David George Gordon to the swarm of curious faces gathered to watch him work, "and they taste like soft-shell crab."

It was Halloween night. I'd trekked across Portland, Oregon, for a bug-cooking demonstration at Paxton Gate, a store that owner Andy Brown describes as "a natural history museum where everything is for sale." Feats of unusual taxidermy covered the walls. There were piranhas, peacocks, and baby lambs mid-frolic. Owl pellets filled a glass jar in one display; another held mouse skeletons sitting upright in tiny royal costumes. It was nightmarish and wonderful, rewarding for the curious but troublesome for the squeamish. Much like what we were about to do. Read more. >>

David George Gordon
Bug chef David George Gordon has been working for the past 15 years to transform bugs from a Fear Factor dare to a Top Chef dish.
Bugs Recipes
Eat-a-Bug Cookbook, Revised: 40 Ways to Cook Crickets, Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs, Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin will be released this July. Get a sneak peak!

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